We’re seeking our new Multi-Year Partners

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Do you work for or know of a not-for-profit organisation with an innovative health promotion or primary prevention initiative that needs funding support to take it to the next level?

 We are looking to partner with eligible groups that are breaking new ground in helping to prevent the onset of chronic disease, the leading cause of illness, disability and death nationally*. 

Far too many Australians die prematurely or live for many years with suboptimal health and wellbeing related to chronic illness, yet many of the common risk factors associated with chronic disease are preventable. That's why our focus will be on helping younger Australians lead healthier lives by supporting health promotion and primary prevention programs that focus on lifestyle risks such as reducing risky alcohol consumption, encouraging healthy eating and getting people active. We also welcome project concepts that target other less commonly known preventable risk factors that contribute significantly to chronic ill health.

Expressions of interest (EOI) are now open for organisations to submit a brief concept for consideration in our Multi-Year Partnership program. We look forward to finding new Multi-Year Partners with unique and compelling project concepts that will be widely accessible and encourage health promoting behaviours amongst younger Australians.

From a total pool of $1.5 million, funding of up to $100,000 - $400,000 per year is up for grabs to help organisations develop, pilot and scale sustainable new approaches and emerging concepts for a period of up to three years.

To submit an EOI visit our Funding pages to learn more about eligibility, assessment criteria and to download the Multi-Year Partnership Guidelines. Submissions close on 17 March 2017.
































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































*Australia's health 2016, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Report, 2016