Young fan from the Amazing Magic Club kicks life goal at State of Origin

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We provided a special opportunity for Jackson Love to stand proudly alongside his sporting idols and favourite player, Anthony Watmough in front of more than 80,000 spectators at Game 2 of State of Origin thanks to nib sponsorship of the NSW Blues.

     

Cerebral Palsy is the most common physical childhood disability in Australia. It is also the most prevalent cause of Hemiplegia - a condition that affects the mobility of one side of the body.

Since 2013, we have been supporting children with Hemiplegia to improve their social and emotional wellbeing through funding of the Amazing Magic Club Program conducted by the Arts Health Institute.

Through nib health funds sponsorship of the NSW Blues, we had the opportunity to select a participant from this program to join the NSW Blues Guard of Honour at Game 2 Holden State of Origin.   

Jackson Love, a courageous eight year old from Warriewood was chosen as a huge football fan. Jackson was diagnosed with Hemiplegia before his first birthday but through hard work and determination at various forms of therapy is now an active and happy young boy.  

Jackson was an inspiration to his family when he stood proud alongside his sporting idols and favourite player, Anthony Watmough in front of more than 80,000 spectators.

"That was the best night of my life! I got to high-five some of the players and the whole crowd was cheering for us, I felt like a star!" Jackson said.

The Amazing Magic Club is a program for children aged 7 to 16 years old who have hemiplegia that uses magic tricks to promote the use of both hands. The program has helped instil in Jackson a 'nothing is impossible' attitude, as well as the opportunity to participate in interactive fun therapy with other children who have hemiplegia.  

For more information about the program click here.